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jonm
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Quote jonm Replybullet Topic: conductivity studies
    Posted: 28 October 2002 at 5:43am

Has anybody done any conductivity studies on the hydrolysis of a silane in water ? I was wondering if there were already examples of this kind of experiment in the literature, I have conducted a lit survey but have'nt really found many relevant papers.

 

-Jon Meegan

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Quote administrator Replybullet Posted: 28 October 2002 at 7:17am

You are right, papers dealing with electrical conductivity use to follow hydrolysis and polycondensation reactions are not too many.

I have found the following paper where electrical conductivity was used as a complementary characterization technique.

FTIR Spectroscopy, SAXS and Electrical Conductivity Studies of the Hydrolysis and Condensation of Zirconium and Titanium Alkoxides
M T. Harris, et. al, J. Sol-Gel Sci. Techn., 8, 41 (1997).

Abstract

A continuous flowing-rapid mixing technique was combined with FTIR, SAXS and electrical conductivity to study the early stages of polymer formation and growth during the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of titanium and zirconium alkoxides. Reaction times as short as 80 milliseconds were investigated. FTIR spectroscopy was used to monitor the water and MOR concentrations during the reaction. Hydrolysis of ~ 2550% of the alkoxy groups was facile. The FTIR and SAXS data showed that condensation was also very rapid. The activity and mobility of the ions in the solution were monitored by electrical conductivity measurements. The decrease in the normalized solution conductivity during the reaction correlated with the loss of [MOR]. Furthermore, the radius of gyration of the growing polymers increased rapidly in regimes where the conductivity and [MOR] decreased fastest. This finding suggests that the mobility of some of the charge carrying species decreases because of the growth in size of the polymers.
The Harris's personal page and contact information is HERE

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jonm
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Quote jonm Replybullet Posted: 28 October 2002 at 7:45am

Many thanks, i'll keep my eyes open for any new papers.

 

-Jon Meegan

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Andreea
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Quote Andreea Replybullet Posted: 21 June 2007 at 3:47pm
Hello,
I have a big problem: I am trying to measure the conductance of a gel electrolyte. This gel electrolyte is sandwiched between 2 FTO plates (conductive glass).
1) What is the easiest way to do so?
2) I was reading something about Impedance spectroscopy, do I really need this? because  I am unfamiliar with this technique
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